Suboccipital Triangle

Quick disclaimer, all drawings are done by me, while I try to remain as accurate as possible, I am only a student. There are natural human variations and differences between textbooks. That being said, I hope my illustrations can be of some help.

The Suboccipital Triangle is pretty much what it sounds like, a triangular region formed by muscles below the occipital bone.

Lots of long names here for such small muscles, but there is a method to the madness. The 2 Obliquus muscles attach at an angle (Oblique = slant). Superior and Inferior just tell you location, i.e. Obliquus Capitis Superior is above Obliquus Capitis Inferior. The 2 Rectus muscles attach straight up and down (Rectus = straight). The Rectus Capitis Posterior Minor can be broken down into: a straight small muscle located at the back of the skull. Rectus Capitis Posterior Major brakes down into: a straight larger muscle located at the back of the skull. Thank goodness for latin.

If you noticed on the chart, all of the muscles in the suboccipital triangle are innervated by the Suboccipital Nerve and are supplied by the Vertebral Artery.

References:

Netter, F. H. (2019). Atlas of human anatomy (7th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier.

Moore, K. L., Agur, A. M., & Dalley, A. F. (2015). Essential clinical anatomy(5th ed.). Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

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Intrinsic Back Muscles

Usual disclaimer, all drawings are done by me, while I try to remain as accurate as possible, I am only a student. There are natural human variations and differences between textbooks. That being said, I hope my illustrations can be of some help.

Before reading about the Intrinsic Back muscles, take a chance to check out this blog by Dr. Throckmorton about ‘How to Succeed in Medical Gross Anatomy‘.

Now there are quite a few intrinsic back muscles. I did not draw them all, but here are some of the ones that are easiest to see in a dissection.

The three muscles: Iliocostalis, Longissimus, and Spinalis are collectively known as the Erector Spinae

The Intrinsic Back Muscles are deep to the Extrinsic Back Muscles, but they are separated into 3 categories based on their depth to one another.

Don’t get discouraged by how many of them there are. Their names give away their location. If it ends with capitis, it attaches to the skull. If it ends with cervicis, it attaches to the cervical vertebrae. If it ends in thoracis, it attaches to the thoracic vertebrae and ribs. If it ends in lumborum, it attaches to the lumbar spine. See! It makes sense.

Now, last but not least is the difference between Extrinsic and Intrinsic Back Muscles. It took me a bit to understand this one. See it has to do with where the muscles develop when we are all tadpoles in our mom’s bellies.

The Intrinsic Back Muscles arise from something called with Epimere of the myotome. While the Extrinsic Back Muscles arise from the Hypomere of the myotome.

This represents a cut section of a developing embryo.

Because of how these sections develop it effects how the different muscle groups are innervated and what they do.

 

References:

Netter, F. H. (2019). Atlas of human anatomy (7th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier.

Moore, K. L., Agur, A. M., & Dalley, A. F. (2015). Essential clinical anatomy(5th ed.). Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

 

 

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Extrinsic Back Muscles

Alright, it’s time to hit the ground running. The bootcamp is over and orientation is in full swing. To help me remember the muscles, nerves, and arteries that we reviewed in class I’m going to share them here.

Quick disclaimer, all drawings are done by me, while I try to remain as accurate as possible, I am only a student. There are natural human variations and differences between textbooks. That being said, I hope my illustrations can be of some help.

This post covers the Extrinsic Back Muscles.

First are the 5 Superficial Back Muscles:

 

After the superficial back muscles are the 2 intermediate back muscles, Serratus Posterior Superior and Serratus Posterior Inferior. Serratus means ‘saw-tooth’ and refers to the appearance of the Serratus muscles.

I apologize for the crappy handwriting, but I have been told that writing instead of typing your notes is better for your memory.

References:

Netter, F. H. (2019). Atlas of human anatomy (7th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier.

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Anatomy Bootcamp

I’ve mentioned before, but these last two weeks I’ve been busy with ARCOM’s Anatomy bootcamp. The summer course takes the first 5 weeks of anatomy and crams it into two. Yes, it is as intense as it sounds. The first day we got a quick orientation of the campus and some I.T. pointers and then it was off to the races. By 0900 we were on our first lecture and it never slowed down.

The setup for the course is lecture from 0900-1200 and then lab from either 1300-1500 or 1500-1700. They split us into two lab groups, so we switched lab times every other day. One of the benefits of the course is that the lab time involved working with actual cadavers. I’ll admit, I was a little nauseous that first day and occasional strong whiffs of the formaldehyde really got to me, but it’s not as bad as it sounds. Luckily we started on the muscles of the back first so it wasn’t so…personal. All of the instructors were really open about the fact that if we needed to step out for a second that it was completely acceptable and there would be no judgement.

I finally have some of my own art to contribute!

We cover the muscles of the back, shoulder, upper and lower arm, spine, lower back, and upper thigh regions. We also went over the nerves, arteries, veins, and bones of those areas. On top of that was also an intro to histology, embryology weeks 1-8, and a little neuroanatomy for good measure. In two weeks!

This class inspired me to break out the charcoals.

With all of that crammed on our plates, you can image it that it was a little stressful, but that was one of the reasons I decided to take the course in the first place. I’ve been out of school for about 2 years now and I never really took anatomy, or at least not anatomy like this. I wanted the refresher, but I also wanted myself in the right mentality for school. I will fully admit that I have no study habits. I worked all through college, there just wasn’t any time. Well, okay, that’s a lie, I had some time to study, but other than physics  (curse you physics!), I never needed to study, so I never learned how. This class has been a great help in making me feel more prepared for the real thing.

I apparently really like drawing the back. Whoops.

The course ended Friday, June 20th with an 84 question lecture exam and a 30 question Anatomy ID test. It kicked my butt, but I was smack in the center of the grade average, so at least I know I wasn’t the only one. I have a lot of ground to cover, but I know what I need to work on now. I look forward to meeting the rest of the class on the 30th.

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The Residents

I moved into The Residents housing back on July 5th. I know, I know, this post is about 3 weeks late, but it’s been a busy three weeks. One of the downsides of moving all the time means that I don’t really have any furniture, so I spent the first week getting my apartment together. The last two weeks have been spent surviving ARCOM’s Anatomy Bootcamp, but that’s a post for another day.

The Residents are a set of new apartments built by the school, but I cannot stress this enough: They are NOT Dorms. For one, if you share an apartment with another roommate you split the rent evenly instead of some places that charge both students 10 grand even though they are sharing a room the size of a shoe box. Families can also live in the apartments, which I thought was nice. Pets are allowed too as long as they are less than 20lbs or a service animal. Though I believe it costs an extra 25$ a month on the rent.

The Residents also have a pool, exercise room, and 4 study rooms.  In the Arkansas heat, the pool is bathwater warm, it’s lovely. The only real concession to being in a school owned building is that no open flames are allowed (i.e. no burning candles or having a grill). It’s more of an insurance thing then the school not trusting us, and they are putting in a grilling patio to make up for it.

According to their Facebook, there are 3 different floor plans for the one bedroom apartments and 3 different floor plans for the two bedrooms. I didn’t ask for a particular floor plan, but I’m really happy with the one I have. I’m always working in the kitchen, so the island is great. All of the apartments come with fridge, oven, microwave, and dishwasher, too.

I purchased my couch and the rest of my furniture about a week after I moved in. There is a surprising number of furniture stores in Fort Smith, so you will certainly be able to find something. Some of them even offer student discounts, so don’t forget to mention if you are an ARCOM student. I got my stuff from Ashley. I wouldn’t normally because they tend to be expensive, but I found everything but the couch in the clearance department. I highly recommend looking into the clearance section of any store you go to, I ended up getting my coffee table and 2 side tables for $118, and my hightop chair for $28.

So, ignoring the mess that is my closet, I also really like the walk-in closets. Considering that I need dress clothes and scrubs for school and then casual clothes for the weekend, I suddenly have so much darn clothing.

Which, speaking of clothes. Check out the washer and dryer that come with the units. Nice, right? Also vital, because after taking an anatomy lab you and your scrubs will stink of formaldehyde.

Overall I really like the apartments. Currently, for a 1 bedroom it is $875, for a 2 bedroom it is either $1200 or $1300 depending on your floor plan. Check out the brochure here. Depending on where you are from, this will either seem cheap or expensive. For the Fort Smith area, $875 for a 1 Bedroom apartment is expensive, but all utilities, plus cable and internet are included. Subtracting the cost of the utilities plus the gas I’m saving by walking to class, I really find it evens out, but there are plenty of options in the area. I know a lot of students that rent from The Havens, a community of houses right behind the school. You really just have to find what works best for you.

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